Lemoine J. Bechtold

(    - 1963) 

4201 South University Blvd.

Englewood, Colorado

 

Bertrand Farr Medal - 1960 

 

 

 Photo:  Daylilies a Fifty-Year Affair

              The Father of the Spider Daylily                

 

     

                  ?Of the daylily world?s father figures, LeMoine J. Bechtold was probably the most self-effacing and least well known.? (Sidney Eddison, A Passion for Daylilies

 

His mother had named him for the French horticulturist Victor LeMoine, and he proved true to his name.  He grew up to love plants and soon became involved in hybridizing.

 

In the early 1940?s LeMoine J. Bechtold chose a site nine miles south of Denver, Colorado with a view of the Rockies and plenty of water for his horticultural enthusiasms and experiments.  In 1922 he ordered every plant in the Gilbert H. Wild & Son catalog. His first introduction appeared in the Wild catalog in 1936: ?a large twisted petaled, lacquered yellow,? named GOLDEN WINGS.  Soon after this an unusual seedling with long narrow recurved petals appeared, which he called HAREM GIRL but never registered.  This was the early spider type he used to create his classics: BLITHE LADY, KINDLY LIGHT, SHIRLEY WILD and LYDIA BECHTOLD.  Kindly Light, registered in 1949 and introduced in 1952, is still the standard for spider daylilies. (Daylilies: A Fifty Year Affair)

 

Spider daylilies fell out of favor in the 1960?s, but have become popular again.  In 1989, the rule for spiders was published in The Journal.  ?A petal length to width ratio of 5:1 or higher.  [Note: The current Spider ratio is 4:1 or higher.]  In classic spiders, petals do not overlap petals, and petals overlap sepals only at the base.? (Eddison)

 

In 1960, Bechtold won the Bertrand Farr Medal for outstanding results in the field of hybridizing.

  

 

Nina Winegar (1950)    [Photo: Provest]

Another picture of 'Nina Winegar' (Bechtold 1950) can be seen on the Nick Chase site here.


Kindly Light (1949)   [Photo: Provest]

 

 

Garden Portrait (1950)    [Photo: Cusick]



A picture of Sunshine Song (Bechtold 1951) can be seen here:

http://picasaweb.google.com/SmokyHillDaylily/AHSRegisteredCulitvarsS02#5277952004254852962
The photo, by Marifrances Hiltz, is from a gallery of pictures donated for use in any manner.

 


 

Summarized information from the E-Mail Robin Archives:


On March 26, 1998, Brian Mahieu of Franklin, Missouri wrote that Bechtold's breeding stock had included

H. thunbergii, so at the base of the foliage of some of his cultivars had purple or pink coloration or stockings. He then referred to A PASSION FOR DAYLILIES, pg. 217, on which Sydney Eddison lists Bechtold's foundation of plants for breeding, including the species minor, Middendorffii, thunbergii and a few varieties of H fulva. Eddison wrote that Bechtold had an unusual seedling called "Harem Girl", never registered, from which had come BLYTHE LADY, KINDLY LIGHT, SHIRLEY WILD, & LYDIA BECHTOLD.  Mahieu than mentoned that six or so forms of KINDLY LIGHT have been circulated, and that he doesn't know if Bechtold's original had the pink coloration at the base.  He added that Bechtold could have acquired H. citrina later.


On January 28, 1999, Bob Schwarz of the East End of the South Fork of Long Island, NY, wrote the E-Mail Robin that Rosemary Whitacre had said that there were 6 or 7 siblings all called KINDLYLIGHT, and that in those days it was not an uncommon practice.  They could be distinguished one from another by pod fertility and "the quality of the chevron that can sometimes be distinguished on the petal in the fading light of an especially hot summer afternoon," but that the radios of petal width to length were about the same.

 

On November 12, 2001, LaVere Webster of Rochester Hills, Michigan, wrote the E-Mail Robin that he had been told that the daylily KINDLY LIGHT was almost lost, that it had been composted. Someone told Mr. Bechtold to "salvage the skinny thing."  LaVere added that thus we have it as an example of a classic spider and that it is the pollen parent of many others, and also won the Harris Olsen Spider Award.





Information about 'Kindly Light' from LaVere Webster, from a letter to our group, June 14, 2009:



KINDLY LIGHT, considered the first classic spider, was introduced in 1949 by Bechtold.  KINDLY LIGHT was so skinny that Bechtold had thrown it on the compost pile.  Someone ask about it and said they would like to buy it.  So it was retrieved, grown and introduced.  It sold out immediately, so Bechtold sold  two sibling seedlings as Kindly Light to meet the demand.  In the next few years the siblings were recalled and replaced with the original Kindly Light.  Question: ?Did he get all the siblings returned to him?  Probably not. (this information according to a conversation with Ned Roberts and Bechtold regarding  Kindly Light.)  Ned and I both think there are about 5 or 6 different plants circulating as Kindly Light.  At least 2 siblings went out from Bechtold as Kindly Light. Then there are crosses of KL x KL or KL x Sibling/look-a-likes). There is also a pod fertile form of KL (the original is not pod fertile 99.9 % of the time).  More than Some "marketeers" have sold anything the looks similar to KL as KL. If your KL will not set pods, there is a good chance it is the original.

 

Here in the Historic DAYLiLY Garden we have ben able to trace our KINDLY LIGHT directly back to the original sale from Bechtold, by Hughes Gardens (now closed), Detroit Botanical Gardens, James Langhammer: Curator, and them to me about 1970.  When Ned Roberts was here in SE Michigan, he looked at a dozen blooms and after a few questions, said that in his opinion it was the original.





Miscellaneous Information:

 

In 1984, Mildred Schlumpf placed second in the Roquemore Award (For Best Slide of a Clump) competition at the AHS Convention in Orland, FL, for her image of  H. 'Kindly Light'


 

 

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Lemoine J. Bechtold

(    - 1963) 

4201 South University Blvd.

Englewood, Colorado

 

Bertrand Farr Medal - 1960 

 

 

 Photo:  Daylilies a Fifty-Year Affair

              The Father of the Spider Daylily                

 

     

                  ?Of the daylily world?s father figures, LeMoine J. Bechtold was probably the most self-effacing and least well known.? (Sidney Eddison, A Passion for Daylilies

 

His mother had named him for the French horticulturist Victor LeMoine, and he proved true to his name.  He grew up to love plants and soon became involved in hybridizing.

 

In the early 1940?s LeMoine J. Bechtold chose a site nine miles south of Denver, Colorado with a view of the Rockies and plenty of water for his horticultural enthusiasms and experiments.  In 1922 he ordered every plant in the Gilbert H. Wild & Son catalog. His first introduction appeared in the Wild catalog in 1936: ?a large twisted petaled, lacquered yellow,? named GOLDEN WINGS.  Soon after this an unusual seedling with long narrow recurved petals appeared, which he called HAREM GIRL but never registered.  This was the early spider type he used to create his classics: BLITHE LADY, KINDLY LIGHT, SHIRLEY WILD and LYDIA BECHTOLD.  Kindly Light, registered in 1949 and introduced in 1952, is still the standard for spider daylilies. (Daylilies: A Fifty Year Affair)

 

Spider daylilies fell out of favor in the 1960?s, but have become popular again.  In 1989, the rule for spiders was published in The Journal.  ?A petal length to width ratio of 5:1 or higher.  [Note: The current Spider ratio is 4:1 or higher.]  In classic spiders, petals do not overlap petals, and petals overlap sepals only at the base.? (Eddison)

 

In 1960, Bechtold won the Bertrand Farr Medal for outstanding results in the field of hybridizing.

  

 

Nina Winegar (1950)    [Photo: Provest]

Another picture of 'Nina Winegar' (Bechtold 1950) can be seen on the Nick Chase site here.


Kindly Light (1949)   [Photo: Provest]

 

 

Garden Portrait (1950)    [Photo: Cusick]



A picture of Sunshine Song (Bechtold 1951) can be seen here:

http://picasaweb.google.com/SmokyHillDaylily/AHSRegisteredCulitvarsS02#5277952004254852962
The photo, by Marifrances Hiltz, is from a gallery of pictures donated for use in any manner.

 


 

Summarized information from the E-Mail Robin Archives:


On March 26, 1998, Brian Mahieu of Franklin, Missouri wrote that Bechtold's breeding stock had included

H. thunbergii, so at the base of the foliage of some of his cultivars had purple or pink coloration or stockings. He then referred to A PASSION FOR DAYLILIES, pg. 217, on which Sydney Eddison lists Bechtold's foundation of plants for breeding, including the species minor, Middendorffii, thunbergii and a few varieties of H fulva. Eddison wrote that Bechtold had an unusual seedling called "Harem Girl", never registered, from which had come BLYTHE LADY, KINDLY LIGHT, SHIRLEY WILD, & LYDIA BECHTOLD.  Mahieu than mentoned that six or so forms of KINDLY LIGHT have been circulated, and that he doesn't know if Bechtold's original had the pink coloration at the base.  He added that Bechtold could have acquired H. citrina later.


On January 28, 1999, Bob Schwarz of the East End of the South Fork of Long Island, NY, wrote the E-Mail Robin that Rosemary Whitacre had said that there were 6 or 7 siblings all called KINDLYLIGHT, and that in those days it was not an uncommon practice.  They could be distinguished one from another by pod fertility and "the quality of the chevron that can sometimes be distinguished on the petal in the fading light of an especially hot summer afternoon," but that the radios of petal width to length were about the same.

 

On November 12, 2001, LaVere Webster of Rochester Hills, Michigan, wrote the E-Mail Robin that he had been told that the daylily KINDLY LIGHT was almost lost, that it had been composted. Someone told Mr. Bechtold to "salvage the skinny thing."  LaVere added that thus we have it as an example of a classic spider and that it is the pollen parent of many others, and also won the Harris Olsen Spider Award.





Information about 'Kindly Light' from LaVere Webster, from a letter to our group, June 14, 2009:



KINDLY LIGHT, considered the first classic spider, was introduced in 1949 by Bechtold.  KINDLY LIGHT was so skinny that Bechtold had thrown it on the compost pile.  Someone ask about it and said they would like to buy it.  So it was retrieved, grown and introduced.  It sold out immediately, so Bechtold sold  two sibling seedlings as Kindly Light to meet the demand.  In the next few years the siblings were recalled and replaced with the original Kindly Light.  Question: ?Did he get all the siblings returned to him?  Probably not. (this information according to a conversation with Ned Roberts and Bechtold regarding  Kindly Light.)  Ned and I both think there are about 5 or 6 different plants circulating as Kindly Light.  At least 2 siblings went out from Bechtold as Kindly Light. Then there are crosses of KL x KL or KL x Sibling/look-a-likes). There is also a pod fertile form of KL (the original is not pod fertile 99.9 % of the time).  More than Some "marketeers" have sold anything the looks similar to KL as KL. If your KL will not set pods, there is a good chance it is the original.

 

Here in the Historic DAYLiLY Garden we have ben able to trace our KINDLY LIGHT directly back to the original sale from Bechtold, by Hughes Gardens (now closed), Detroit Botanical Gardens, James Langhammer: Curator, and them to me about 1970.  When Ned Roberts was here in SE Michigan, he looked at a dozen blooms and after a few questions, said that in his opinion it was the original.





Miscellaneous Information:

 

In 1984, Mildred Schlumpf placed second in the Roquemore Award (For Best Slide of a Clump) competition at the AHS Convention in Orland, FL, for her image of  H. 'Kindly Light'